Nea foundation global learning fellowship program

So normally with this series we look at lectures and videos that focus on a single artist, but today we’re throwing both of those concepts out the window and zooming in on a recent panel held at the annual Ableton Loop Conference featuring educators, not artists, and not one, but three of them. The panelists: Ethan Hein, Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at NYU, adjunct professor of music technology at NYU and Montclair State University, and Soundfly instructor; Melissa Uye-Parker, British songwriter, performer, and educator based in London; and Jack Schaedler, software developer at Ableton who has worked on Ableton’s microsite for learning music fundamentals. And the panel was moderated by none other than Dennis DeSantis, composer, sound designer, percussionist, and author, who is also Head of Documentation for Ableton.

The in-depth tone controls also allowed the Space Echo to be manipulated and create some wild effects.  If you turn up the intensity control as the echo fades out you’ll get this intense swelling effect that you can hear on many dub or reggae songs. If you change the tape speed or delay rate you’ll hear crazy pitch shifting and oscillating effects. Artists like Pink Floyd, Radiohead, and Bob Marley have all used the RE-201 to create absolutely stunning music.

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Rappers who aren’t from the hood

There’s something to be said for those memories and those feelings that we associate with cassettes. And for an emerging band looking to make their mark, release new music, and connect with their fans in a dynamic way (all while spending less than traditional CDs  cost or merch would cost to manufacture), the cassette is the perfect option.

Sammy Hakim is an up-and-coming young songwriter based in New York City. In May, 2018 she graduated from Berklee College of Music with a Major in songwriting and a focus in music business. These days she spends most of her time in songwriting sessions with artists all over the country.

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Female rappers 2019

The 1% skim milk of the music industry has survived the barbarians at the gate, born again within the world of music streaming. In 2019, the listener pays only a little more for the convenience of streaming, but the money they do pay is vacuumed up by large tech and labels via the gated publishing communities like Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play. Artists still struggle, as the innovations of tech revolutionaries were co-opted and sanitized by corporate interest.

“In My Feelings”: Check out the rad three-beat pickup to start. I’ll call it an intro, even though it’s only three-fourths of a complete bar. The guest verse, provided by The City Girls out of Miami, smashes into the chorus like peanut butter and chocolate for the most funky-crazy chorus variation of the year (C3). It’s so chopped up that Drake has to spoon-feed us the original chorus directly afterwards — although, technically, even this stabilizing chorus version counts as a variation because he drops everything out at the end for two whole bars before the bridge. Slick craftsmanship.

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Chamber music america new jazz works

His guest spot on ZULI’s “Kollu l-Joloud” brought his haunting voice to the forefront, and now Saudi Arabia’s mysterious MSYLMA has released his own debut record. Dhil-un Taht Shajarat Al-Zaqum draws lyrically upon pre-Islamic and Quranic poetry, exploring themes of existential angst over a backdrop of abstract, grimy beats. It’s not a conventional listen in any sense, but even without being able to understand the Arabic lyrics, there’s something immediate and emotional about MSYLMA’s plaintive vocals. You can grab the album through Boomkat.

It turns out a lot of those Disney movies were scored by the same person, Alan Menken. Perhaps he was anticipating that this music would eventually lock inside his audience’s subconscious when he wrote it!

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Personal government grants

At the opposite end of traditional form is through-composition — essentially a style of composition that doesn’t repeat sections of music, lyrics, and might not even repeat melodic themes. It could be argued that the lyrics of “All My Friends” is through-composed.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

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