Best gangsta rap songs of all time

Remember above when we identified that Houston uses the notes 1, 3, and 5 more in the chorus than the verse? Those notes are hierarchically more important, and so they appear in the most important section of a song: the chorus. The chorus is hierarchically more important from a structural standpoint, so part of the reason this song is so effective at creating a memorable musical experience is that it joins predictable notes with their predictable placement in the song.

If you are still unsure if your mix is ready for mastering, send it to the mastering engineer and ask their opinion. Any professional engineer will be able to help you catch potential issues in your sound and give you advice on how to address them within your mix to ensure best possible final results for your mastered song.

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Rap groups of the 90s

Not all of us have access to the kind of gear that the Boards are rocking. As usual though, we can find some good digital approximations on the internet. One of my absolute favourites is James Peck’s VHS Audio Degradation Suite. It provides emulations (with optional speaker simulation) of old video tape audio playback, based on machines in various states of disrepair. If anything digital is going to get you even close to Boards of Canada’s bevy of broken-down gear, this is it. While it’s free, it only works through Native Instruments’ paid Reaktor 6 soft synth platform. If you don’t already have that, you can try it out for 30 days.

We’ll keep it in the family again with the second release in Ashikawa’s “Wave Notation” series, his own album, Still Way. This record actually features Midori Takada on harp and vibraphone. Ashikawa only released three records in this series before he died; the third was a full LP of pensive Erik Satie pieces played on solo piano by Satsuki Shibano.

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Chamber music america mission statement

All of the notes above Fret 12 on any string are just repetitions of the same notes, an octave above (for example, Fret 14 on the 6th string is an F#, an octave above the same note on Fret 2 on the same string). Therefore, we can simply subtract 12 from the fret number and proceed repeating the same process we have discussed until now.

Many artists brag about getting very little sleep because they’re so committed to winning. And that’s great. Good for them. And, yeah, you may have to go through seasons where you’re not getting a ton of sleep. Maybe you’re working on a project that you’re super passionate about and it’s taking some time. That’s fine, but give yourself a break every now and then.

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