Apply for grants and scholarships

Ithaca is one of those college towns that kind of flies under the radar. Beautiful and serene, this secluded college town can often be seen as too remote, even though smart touring artists would be wise to look into the wealth of upstate New York university towns, including Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse. Anyway, Ithaca has earned its stripes well as a destination for touring bands, and for good reason. Among its many venues like The Haunt and The Dock, it’s also home to nonprofit Ithaca Underground, which helps emerging artists of all genres book shows and get their start. Plus, they’re one of the few organizations that put together multi-genre shows, so you can see punk rock, acoustic, and hip-hop all on the same bill.

When you compose, do you gravitate toward certain instruments? And how much of the composition is being orchestrated in your inner ear and how much of it are you playing while you write?

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Exhibition grants

Using whatever format you want (spreadsheet, notepad, stickies) write down the things you want to get done, say, this month. That way, when you sit down to write songs, record music, email a music industry pro, or whatever, you know exactly what you need to do next. Plus, as you cross things off the list, it’s a little encouragement that you’re making progress.

Okay, how about A? The interval between F and A, called a major third, is the same as the one between C and E. So we can go up a major third from F by multiplying 4/3 by 5/4 to get an A at 5/3 Hz. Alternatively, A is a perfect fifth above D, so we could just as easily multiply 9/8 by 3/2 to get… uh oh… 27/16 Hz. This is a problem. While 5/3 and 27/16 are pretty close to each other, they are not the same. Which one of these should we use? We’d ideally want the interval between D and A to be a perfect fifth (a multiple of 3/2), but if A is at 5/3 Hz, then it’ll clash pretty horribly with D at 9/8 Hz. On the other hand, we’d expect the interval between A to E to be a perfect fifth too. But if we go up a fifth from 27/16 Hz, we get 81/32 Hz, and if we move that down an octave to 81/64 Hz, we’ll be pretty close to E at 5/4 Hz, but not close enough.

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