Chorus america

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

We all have friends who spend more time in their virtual worlds, and video games have some pretty interesting soundtracks to keep players coming back. Many songwriters have been quite successful in creating music for video games. Kotaku, the popular gaming site, profiles artists already composing for games, and ASCAP has created a FAQ about how music licensing works when it comes to video games.

Here are a few tips for upping your practicing game every day. But getting ready for a recording session requires doing things a little differently, so here are a few quick tips for how to make the most of your time in the studio:

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Whatever Bach intended, the chaconne is a very effective piece of sad music. It helps that there’s the long section in the middle where it switches to D major and gets unexpectedly happy, before returning to D minor, the saddest of all keys. Sadness is that much sadder if you’re expecting happiness.

Our mentors can give you feedback in all three areas on a weekly basis during the program. They might offer a new perspective on your song based on your intentions, or give you honest feedback about where a piece falls short based on the expectations of the field, if that’s part of your goal. This can help you hone in on where to focus your efforts to make the most progress.

When applying the Dorian mode to “modal” music, or soloing over a single chord, like many jazz improvisers tend to do, it can be helpful to include arpeggios in our lines. Here is a Dorian arpeggio (Dm6).

Black Rooster’s Cypress TT-15 guitar amp head is an emulation of the Orange Tiny Terror amplifier, and is great for creating distorted lead guitar tones when you’re recording your guitar direct in. I find that it even works nicely on bass guitar and lead synths, especially when you don’t want your track to sound predictable. It has very simple functions, but it’s creatively playable and easy to dial in a great tone.

+ Producing and mixing music at home? Check out Soundfly’s brand new mentored online course, Songwriting For Producers, to take all those unfinished ideas and transform them into fully fleshed out, compelling songs! Free preview here.

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James Brown’s Live at the Apollo, 1962 is a masterclass in showmanship and musicianship that transcends genre. From the Rolling Stones to Anderson .Paak, you can see the influence that The Hardest Working Man in Show Business has left with this album, this performance, and so many of his other albums and recorded performances (many of them back at The Apollo!).

Brant Wilson is an amateur musician and student based out of Indianapolis, Indiana with a special love for classical music and a goal to learn to play as many instruments as possible.

In this OpEd from a former Soundfly student, we explore the effective active learning approaches key to getting the most out of any learning experience.

Okay, how about A? The interval between F and A, called a major third, is the same as the one between C and E. So we can go up a major third from F by multiplying 4/3 by 5/4 to get an A at 5/3 Hz. Alternatively, A is a perfect fifth above D, so we could just as easily multiply 9/8 by 3/2 to get… uh oh… 27/16 Hz. This is a problem. While 5/3 and 27/16 are pretty close to each other, they are not the same. Which one of these should we use? We’d ideally want the interval between D and A to be a perfect fifth (a multiple of 3/2), but if A is at 5/3 Hz, then it’ll clash pretty horribly with D at 9/8 Hz. On the other hand, we’d expect the interval between A to E to be a perfect fifth too. But if we go up a fifth from 27/16 Hz, we get 81/32 Hz, and if we move that down an octave to 81/64 Hz, we’ll be pretty close to E at 5/4 Hz, but not close enough.

If you’re an electronically trained home producer, you might not have a lot of experience writing lyrics — perhaps you’re more used to working with outside lyricists, singers, and topline melody writers. But in my online course, Songwriting for Producers, I’ve set out to give you the tools and strategies you need to become a profession, all-in-one producer, capable of churning out mega-hits without relying on collaboration to get you that extra mile.