Top hip hop artists 2018

When you pluck a guitar string, it vibrates to and fro. You can tell how fast the string is vibrating by listening to the pitch it produces. Shorter strings vibrate faster, and make higher pitches. Longer strings vibrate slower, and make lower pitches. The scientific term for the rate at which the string vibrates is its frequency. You measure frequency in hertz (Hz), otherwise known as vibrations per second. The standard tuning pitch, A440, is the pitch you get when your guitar string vibrates to and fro 440 times per second.

The main takeaway here is that you don’t have to follow a typical form if you don’t want to! There’s so much great through-composed music, and sometimes, it can be really freeing to embrace this kind of writing.

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2020 nea global fellowship

A few oddballs and nerds have explored tuning systems that use bigger prime numbers to generate finer pure intervals. Harry Partch used the primes up to 11 to make a tuning system that divides up the octave into 43 pure parts rather than 12 impure ones. You can try the Partch scale using the Wilsonic app or Audiokit Synth One. It’s extremely strange! But, I guess, it’s strange in a pure way?

One of the keys to obtaining this sound is fluctuation. Drive your synth sound through a piece of hardware or a plugin until you can hear the warmth and compression. Then place a regular old EQ on your chain, high-passing at 120Hz and low-passing around 6kHz. This will give you that blunted, warm sound. Then, in whatever soft synth you’re using, start firing up your LFOs (low frequency oscillators). Set them to a moderate speed and depth (nothing crazy, we’re going for chill vibes) and start routing them to various settings.

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